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Researchers discover a simple amoeba holds the key to better treatment for Alzheimer's disease

from MNTdementia - 24 Jan 14

Scientists have discovered the use of a simple single-celled amoeba to understand the function of human proteins in causing Alzheimer's disease.



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Sigma-1 receptor implicated in cell survival of rare neurodegenerative diseases

from MNTdementia - 24 Jan 14

Anavex Life Sciences Corp. has announced that a publication in the current issue of scientific journal Neuropathology potentially extends the opportunity for ANAVEX PLUS to additional neurodegenerative diseases beyond Alzheimer's.



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Inovio Pharmaceuticals unveils potent new immune activator

from MNToncology - 24 Jan 14

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has unveiled that the company has developed a new DNA-based cytokine immune activator, interleukin -33 (IL-33), that in combination with optimized DNA vaccines delivered by electroporation increased the potency and efficacy of the therapeutic response to the DNA vaccines in a preclinical study.



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Fixing damaged hearts through tissue engineering

from MNTcvs - 24 Jan 14

In the U.S., someone suffers a heart attack every 34 seconds - their heart is starved of oxygen and suffers irreparable damage. Engineering new heart tissue in the laboratory that could eventually be implanted into patients could help, and scientists are reporting a promising approach tested with rat cells.



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Research presents new hope of early diagnosis of major cause of blindness

from MNTdiabetes - 24 Jan 14

Research is under way to develop new techniques for detecting diabetic retinopathy at early onset with the hope of improving prevention and treatment of this major cause of blindness.Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes, occurring when high blood sugar levels damage the cells in the retina at the back of the eye.



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Insulin-producing beta cells from stem cells: Scientists decipher early molecular mechanisms of differentiation

from MNTdiabetes - 24 Jan 14

The findings of the scientists of the Institute of Diabetes and Regeneration Research (IDR) at Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU) provide new insights into the molecular regulation of stem cell differentiation. These results reveal important target structures for regenerative therapy approaches to chronic diseases such as diabetes.



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Morbidity higher in obese liver transplant recipients with diabetes, survival not impacted

from MNTdiabetes - 24 Jan 14

Researchers from New Zealand report that morbidity following liver transplant is highest among obese patients with diabetes, but these risk factors do not influence post-transplant survival.



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Clasado and University of Oxford demonstrate effect of prebiotics on brain and gut in pre-clinical study

from MNTgastro - 24 Jan 14

Clasado, the manufacturers and suppliers of the second generation prebiotic Bimuno®, and The Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, have announced the results of pre-clinical research demonstrating prebiotics affect the relationship between the gut and the brain. This collaborative research will complement and serve as a precursor to current human trials.



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Blocking NMDA receptors to limit neurotoxicity

from MNTdementia - 24 Jan 14

Structural biologists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and collaborators at Emory University have obtained important scientific results likely to advance efforts to develop new drugs targeting NMDA receptors in the brain.



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Diagnosis by 'smart' holograms

from MNTdiabetes - 24 Jan 14

'Smart' holograms, which are currently being tested to monitor diabetes, and could be used to monitor a wide range of medical and environmental conditions in future, have been developed by researchers."While these sorts of inexpensive, portable tests aren't meant to replace a doctor, holograms could enable people to easily monitor their own health," Ali Yetisen said.



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Blood-forming stem cell function promoted by estrogen

from MNTendo - 24 Jan 14

Scientists have known for years that stem cells in male and female sexual organs are regulated differently by their respective hormones.



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Improved understanding of how our brains control our arms may lead to design of better brain controlled prosthetic limbs

from MNTneuro - 24 Jan 14

Ready, set, go.Sometimes that's how our brains work. When we anticipate a physical act, such as reaching for the keys we noticed on the table, the neurons that control the task adopt a state of readiness, like sprinters bent into a crouch.Other times, however, our neurons must simply react, such as if someone were to toss us the keys without gesturing first, to prepare us to catch.



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Adults still think about numbers like kids

from MNTneuro - 24 Jan 14

Children understand numbers differently than adults. For kids, one and two seem much further apart then 101 and 102, because two is twice as big as one, and 102 is just a little bigger than 101. It's only after years of schooling that we're persuaded to see the numbers in both sets as only one integer apart on a number line.



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Alzheimer's trial disappointing but yields new ideas

from MNTdementia - 24 Jan 14

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine documents the high-profile failure of a promising drug, bapineuzumab, to slow cognitive decline in dementia patients. Dr. Stephen Salloway, the study's lead author, says researchers have learned key lessons that they are eager to apply in new attempts to find effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Dr.



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Window into living cells provided by 3-D imaging, no dye required

from MNToncology - 24 Jan 14

Living cells are ready for their close-ups, thanks to a new imaging technique that needs no dyes or other chemicals, yet renders high-resolution, three-dimensional, quantitative imagery of cells and their internal structures - all with conventional microscopes and white light.



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Breast cancer drug improves outcomes for some bladder cancer patients

from MNToncology - 24 Jan 14

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have found amplification of HER2, a known driver of some breast cancers, in a type of bladder cancer called micropapillary urothelial carcinoma (MPUC) and have shown that the presence of HER2 amplification is associated with particularly aggressive tumors.



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'Liquid biopsy' a potential test for bladder cancer

from MNToncology - 24 Jan 14

Findings from a Loyola University Medical Center study ultimately could lead to tests to screen for and diagnose bladder cancer.Bladder cancer is the fourth most common non-skin cancer. But there is no good screening test for it, and there has been limited progress in characterizing how aggressive an individual's bladder cancer will be.



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Computer model simulates blood vessel growth

from MNToncology - 24 Jan 14

University of Utah bioengineers showed that tiny blood vessels grow better in the laboratory if the tissue surrounding them is less dense. Then the researchers created a computer simulation to predict such growth accurately - an early step toward treatments to provide blood supply to tissues damaged by diabetes and heart attacks and to skin grafts and implanted ligaments and tendons.



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Does your spouse have type 2 diabetes? You could also be at risk

from MNTdiabetes - 24 Jan 14

Although we learn to share many things when living with a partner, type 2 diabetes is not usually on the list. But new research from McGill University Health Centre in Canada suggests that if a person has type 2 diabetes, their partner is more likely to have or develop it.This is according to a study published in the journal BMC Medicine.



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Care managers in patient centered medical homes increase improvements in diabetes patients

from MNTdiabetes - 24 Jan 14

Patient centered medical homes (PCMHs) have been found to be an effective way to help care for patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes. Dr. Robert Gabbay, M.D., Ph.D.



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Novel biosensor developed to target salmonella

from MNTgastro - 24 Jan 14

An array of tiny diving boards can perform the Olympian feat of identifying many strains of salmonella at once.The novel biosensor developed by scientists at Rice University in collaboration with colleagues in Thailand and Ireland may make the detection of pathogens much faster and easier for food-manufacturing plants.



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How does the brain link different memories?

from MNTneuro - 24 Jan 14

Neuroscientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology believe they have discovered two neural circuits that coordinate how time-linked memories are formed and stored in the brain.Scientists already know that memories of events (called "episodic memories") are created in the hippocampus area of the brain.



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Pharmacokinetics, hemodynamic and metabolic effects of epinephrine to prevent post-operative low cardiac output syndrome in children

from Critical Care Forum - 24 Jan 14

IntroductionThe response to exogenous epinephrine (Ep) is difficult to predict given the multitude of factors involved such as broad pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic between-subject variabilities, which may be more pronounced in children. We investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Ep, co-administered with milrinone, in children who underwent open heart surgical repair for congenital defects following cardiopulmonary bypass, including associated variability factors. Methods:



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Type 1 diabetes.

from Diabetes abs. - 24 Jan 14

Related Articles Type 1 diabetes. Lancet. 2014 Jan 4;383(9911):69-82 Authors: Atkinson MA, Eisenbarth GS, Michels AW Abstract Over the past decade, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of type 1 diabetes has grown substantially, particularly with regard to disease prediction and heterogeneity, pancreatic pathology, and epidemiology. Technological improvements in insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors help patients with type 1 diabetes



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Emergency diagnosis more common for cancers of ‘unknown origin’

from Cancer Research News - 23 Jan 14

pa_patientdoctor.jpg News report 23 January 2014 Rarer cancers with an undefined origin are twice as likely to be diagnosed in A&E than cancers where the initial tumour site is known.


 

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