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Link between bad cholesterol carriers that increase heart disease risk in women and sex hormone levels at midlife

from MNTchol - 01 Jul 14

As hormone levels change during the transition to menopause, the quality of a woman's cholesterol carriers degrades, leaving her at greater risk for heart disease, researchers at the University of...



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Comprehensive review of treatments for depression in cancer patients

from MNToncology - 01 Jul 14

Depression is common in cancer, up to half of all patients facing the disease experience depressive symptoms, ranging from mild to severe.



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Predicting aggressiveness of oral cancer

from MNToncology - 01 Jul 14

Studying mouth cancer in mice, researchers have found a way to predict the aggressiveness of similar tumors in people, an early step toward a diagnostic test that could guide treatment, according to...



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Large-scale patient data analytics can help create personalized, early intervention for metabolic syndrome

from MNTdiabetes - 01 Jul 14

Research published in the American Journal of Managed Care demonstrates that analysis of patient records using state-of-the-art data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome.



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Insulin therapy for type 2 diabetes 'may do more harm than good'

from MNTdiabetes - 01 Jul 14

A new study suggests that for older patients with type 2 diabetes, the negative effects of treatment with insulin pills or injections may outweigh the benefits.



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Researchers explore the genetic underpinnings of nerve-cell spacing

from MNTneuro - 01 Jul 14

The functional organization of the central nervous system depends upon a precise architecture and connectivity of distinct types of neurons.



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Neuroscientists inhibit muscle contractions by shining light on spinal cord neurons

from MNTneuro - 01 Jul 14

For the first time, MIT neuroscientists have shown they can control muscle movement by applying optogenetics - a technique that allows scientists to control neurons' electrical impulses with light ...



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Potential new use for cancer drug in gene therapy for blood disorders

from MNThaem - 01 Jul 14

Scientists working to make gene therapy a reality have solved a major hurdle: how to bypass a blood stem cell's natural defenses and efficiently insert disease-fighting genes into the cell's genome.



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diabetes AND ("last 30 days"[PDat] AND (jsubsetaim[text]) ); +16 new citations

from Diabetes abs. - 01 Jul 14

16 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: diabetes AND ("last 30 days"[PDat] AND (jsubsetaim[text]) ) These pubmed results were generated on 2014/07/01PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine, includes over 15 million citations for biomedical articles back to the 1950's. These citations are from MEDLINE and additional life science journals. PubMed includes links to many sites providing full



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Plasma and urine neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin in the diagnosis of new onset acute kidney injury in critically ill patients

from Critical Care Forum - 01 Jul 14

IntroductionNeutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) has been demonstrated to be a useful early diagnostic biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI) where the timing of the insult is certain. However NGAL is not well validated in adult critical care practice because of indeterminate timing of injury. Therefore we sought to establish the predictive ability of both urine and plasma NGAL to detect AKI in ICU patients.MethodThis prospective observational study was performed in a busy large dis



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Cancer Research UK launches visionary new lung cancer centre of excellence

from Cancer Research News - 01 Jul 14

Press release Cancer Research UK is bringing together leading researchers from London and Manchester in the groundbreaking new Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence at Manchester and UCL*. The new Centre is a key component of Cancer Research UK’s renewed focus to beat lung cancer. The disease is the second most common cancer in the UK and the biggest cancer killer. Developing better treatments for patients with lung cancer has lagged behind other cancers, with little improvement seen over time due



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Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency Clinical Clues to a Potentially Treatable Cause of Adult-Onset Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

ImportanceHereditary spastic paraplegia is a highly heterogeneous group of neurogenetic disorders with pure and complicated clinical phenotypes. No treatment is available for these disorders. We identified 2 unrelated families, each with 2 siblings with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency manifesting a complicated form of adult-onset hereditary spastic paraparesis partially responsive to betaine therapy.ObservationsBoth pairs of siblings presented with a similar combina



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Immunophenotyping of Cerebrospinal Fluid Cells in Multiple Sclerosis In Search of Biomarkers

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

ImportanceCerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is the compartment in closest proximity to the central nervous system (CNS) parenchyma and might reflect immune pathology in inflammatory CNS disorders like multiple sclerosis (MS). Multiparameter flow cytometry is used to characterize immunological alterations in the CSF of patients with MS.ObjectivesTo present a comprehensive review of the cellular alterations in CSF that distinguish MS from physiological conditions and other CNS disorders; integrate relevan



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The Saddle and the Horse’s Tail Cauda Equina Syndrome

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

The cauda equina syndrome is a clinical diagnosis usually requiring immediate surgical treatment to prevent long-lasting neurological sequelae. A 33-year-old woman with a 2-week history of left-sided leg pain and perianal hypoesthesia was referred to us when urinary retention and fecal incontinence developed. The clinical diagnosis of cauda equina syndrome was made. Imaging revealed an intraspinal mass filling up the entire spinal canal at the L5-S1 level (Figure 1).



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Suspected Subdural Hematoma

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

A 71-year-old woman was admitted for 3 inaugural right-sided focal seizures. Shortly before, she had experienced a minor head trauma. Her neurological examination finding was normal. A brain computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed abnormalities supporting the diagnosis of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH), with a subcutaneous collection regarding this subdural hematoma (Figure, A-C). She did not undergo surgery, and monitoring with brain MRI was recommended. Three mon



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Magnetic Resonance Imaging Observations in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

A 63-year-old woman with no medical history presented with two weeks of personality changes and social withdrawal, ignoring family, friends, and work. There were no apparent hallucinations or delusions. Her son brought her for evaluation after she began having difficulty recalling personal information and family names.



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Relationship Between Leukocyte Telomere Length, Telomerase Activity, and Hippocampal Volume in Early Aging

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

Leukocyte telomere length (TL) provides an index of cellular age that predicts the incidence of age-related diseases and early mortality in older adults. Telomerase adds telomeric repeats to terminal DNA, a critical process that helps stall genomic instability and apoptotic events that are triggered when telomeres shorten to a critical length. Evidence from a telomerase-deficient mouse model demonstrated the widespread consequences of telomere attrition on neurodegeneration including reduced pro



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Features of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders With Aquaporin-4 and Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein Antibodies

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

To the Editor In their article, Kitley and colleagues characterized the features of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO)/NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) with myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (Abs) and compared them with patients with aquaporin-4 antibody (AQP4-Ab)–positive NMO/NMOSD. They found that patients with myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein Abs who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for NMO were different from those with AQP4-Abs in terms of sex preponderance, age distri



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Features of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders and Aquaporin-4 With Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein Antibodies—Reply

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

In Reply We thank Gao and colleagues for their comments regarding our article. We agree that the spectrum of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is much wider than originally thought and that it is now recognized that the term NMO is not synonymous with aquaporin-4 antibody (AQP4-Ab) disease. In our experience, the presence of AQP4-Ab indicates a generally severe, frequently relapsing central nervous system inflammatory disease and we manage AQP4-Ab–positive patients with early and long-term immunosuppre



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Moving to Fingolimod From Natalizumab in Multiple Sclerosis: The ENIGM Is Not Solved

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

To the Editor Cohen et al reported the efficacy and safety results of switching from natalizumab to fingolimod in patients with multiple sclerosis in a real-practice setting in the ENIGM (Enquête Nationale sur I’Introduction du Fingolimod en Relais au Natalizumab) study. We read the article with great interest; however, we are afraid that some of the presented results may not be conclusively supported by the analyses that were performed.



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Moving to Fingolimod From Natalizumab in Multiple Sclerosis—Reply

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

In Reply We read with attention comments from Bianco et al regarding the ENIGM (Enquête Nationale sur I’Introduction du Fingolimod en Relais au Natalizumab) study.



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Tau, S-100 Calcium-Binding Protein B, and Neuron-Specific Enolase as Biomarkers of Concussion

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

To the Editor That the Quanterix platform was able to detect elevated levels of tau at subfentamole concentrations after sports-related concussion is indeed an exciting development in the article by Shahim and colleagues. However, the conclusion made by Shahim et al, and by the accompanying editorial, that S-100 calcium-binding protein B (S-100B) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) lack use as diagnostic markers is flawed for several reasons.



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Tau, S-100 Calcium-Binding Protein B, and Neuron-Specific Enolase as Biomarkers of Concussion—Reply

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

In Reply We thank Bazarian and Merchant-Borna for their comment on our article, suggesting that we should have interpreted the S-100 calcium-binding protein B (S-100B) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) data in our study more positively than we did. We wish to clarify that we maintain our conclusion about the limited diagnostic value of S-100B and NSE in the context of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) for the following reasons: (1) the magnitude of the biomarker changes following concussion was




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JAMA Neurology

from ArchNeur - 01 Jul 14

Mission Statement: The mission of JAMA Neurology is to publish scientific information primarily important for those physicians caring for people with neurologic disorders but also for those interested in the structure and function of the normal and diseased nervous system. These specific aims are (1) to make timely publication of original research of the nervous system, (2) to record observations of single patients or groups of patients that will provide new information and insights, (3) to repo


 

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